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Archive for June, 2012

This Sunday, July 1st, King Market is hosting its annual Build a Burger from 11-1. Build a Burger is a simple premise, PFM Vendors donate burger fixins, volunteers cook up the burger and the rest of us get Oregon-rasied pastured beef for $5. Plus 100% of proceeds go directly to Farmers Market Fund’s Fresh Exchange Program, a project that matches funds for Market-goers who use the Oregon Trail Card. The net result is more spending power for people who need to stretch their food dollar, more money stays in the local food economy helping growers, ranchers and farmers and selfishly, real good $5 burgers. Special thanks to Deck Family, Pine Mountain Ranch for the

Build Your Own Burger
With These

beef, Grand Central for Buns, Groundworks for all the veg and Unbound Pickling & Choi’s Kimchi making the burger that much more special.

If you can’t make the event, aren’t that interested in a burger, or more interested in learning about the Farmers Market Fund and Fresh Exchange, you can follow this link to donate to the cause.

With the 4th falling on a Wednesday this year, I’m unsure if this weekend or the following is the holiday weekend. I’ll objectively measure the amount of fireworks being shot in N. Portland over the next 2 weekends and post the final results. Because the 4th falls on Wednesday there will be no Shemanski Market on the 4th. It’s a holiday of sorts – the farm never rests – for all our farmers and vendors.

And speaking of North Portland, Kenton Market continues to roll on. The Market is located in the central part of Kenton’s business district. You can take in the whole neighborhood, pick up fruit, veg and tacos and salsa and then check out books from the library, get a beer, pick up some meat from Cason’s to go with your produce. The Market goes from 3-7, at the corner of North Denver and McClellan, the neighborhood is there all the time, check it out.

Kraut on your hotdog?
Upgrade the experience!

PSU goes from 8:30-2 on Saturday. Beginning this week Sunset Lane Farm, aka the Chicory People, will be joining us. Word is they’ll have chicory. Unbound Pickling, Build a Burger donator,  has a new Maraschino cherry for good for ice cream sundaes or old fashioned(s) – Get your Don Draper on, with a touch of Oregon. Don’t forget to say thanks to Pine Mt, the Deck Family, Grand Central, Choi’s and Groundworks this weekend – if they are good enough for our burgers, imagine what they will do for yours. There’ll be plenty of stuff to stuff in your picnic basket at PSU, Sunday’s King and Monday’s Pioneer Courthouse Square, remember don’t wait for Wednesday to do your shopping, Shemanski is closed this Wednesday, the 4th.

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This Saturday, June 23, from 9am-2pm Portland Revels will be holding a special free performance at the southend of the PSU Market, plus processions through the market at 9am and 1:20pm. Portland Revels celebrates the seasons through song, dance, story and ritual of the past and present, creating community across generations and cultures. Their SummerFaire celebration at the market this weekend will be in honor of the Summer Solstice.

Event details courtesy of Portland Revels:

The revelry

Portland Revels’ new free public event in honor of the Summer Solstice will bookend our successful Christmas Revels performances honoring the Winter Solstice now in their 18th year in Portland. We’ll be at the PSU Farmer’s Market from 9am to 2pm on Saturday, June 23rd, the closest Saturday to the June 21 Summer Solstice.

Our mission is to celebrate the seasons in community with traditions and the performing arts, so we’ve invited some wonderful performers to grace our main stage, and we’ll have smaller acts “on the green,” as well as cultural groups, storytelling, and kids activities on the block next to – and in – the lively public venue of the PSU Farmer’s Market. Since many of the seasonal folk arts traditions that Revels preserves and showcases arose in the context of the agricultural cycle of planting and harvesting and small village life, basing this new celebration in the Farmer’s Market seems like coming home.

At 9:00am we’ll sally forth with banners flying and voices lifted in our opening procession to greet the morning. Then folks can enjoy performances on the mainstage and on the green until our 1:20pm closing procession.

Main stage guest performers include:

ViVoce Singers
The Oregon Chorale
Indonesian Performing Arts of Oregon.
The Portland Peace Choir
Yiddish Republik
Original Practice Shakespeare
Bollywood Movez
Inspirational Sounds from Latin America
NW Conservatory of Dance
The Tir Eoghain Dancers

On the green we’ll enjoy:

Renegade Rose Morris team
Maldon Meehan and her Sean Nos Irish Dancers
The Wild Rose Garland Dancers
Costumed rustics
Storytellers from the Portland Storytellers Guild

A happy reveler

We’ll have volunteer hosts offering hands-on fun workshops about the solstice, the seasons, and arts and folk traditions to engage and educate for children and families. And we are hosting cultural and ethnic organizations from around the world to share their home traditions about the Solstice, the sun, and the seasons.  Please join us!

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By Barb Skinner

The NW Portland Farmers Market is in full swing with plenty of opportunities to do more than shop for produce! Taste the Place is a program that introduces market attendees to local restaurants as well as ideas for cooking the produce they buy. Here’s what happened last week:

Berry Good

Elephant’s Delicatessen hosted a sampling booth with delicious strawberry shortcake – an example of how they incorporate seasonal produce into their menu. Many Portlandians are fond of Elephant’s Deli for their soups and sandwiches, and love to dine in at one of their 6 locations around town, have their business meetings catered, or choose the Uptown stores’ Garden Room for their special events. The delicious treat was welcome at the sunny evening market last week.

Mmmm, kale

Each week shoppers can also sample a recipe prepared at the market with produce from the market… Last week a Greens and Bean Salad was on display – its sweet, tangy dressing perfectly complemented the bitterness of raw kale, showing many kale skeptics that kale can easily be enjoyed raw when prepared well.

Also available at Taste the Place is a recipe box providing shoppers with hundreds of free ideas for meals that involve the fresh, local produce.

Next Thursday’s activity? Senior Bingo Night… See you then!

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Interest in food has never been higher. People want to know where their veg, salmon and berriescame from, if it was raised sustainably and most it importantly, how to cook it best. While this could be an affliction of people so separated from food chain that they seek to introduce themselves to food, there is a deeper current to this phenomenon…people understand when you talk about food, you’re talking about everything: The meals you were raised on, the choices you make as an adult, how you share food with your family, neighbors and community. How we eat is nothing short of how we live and interact in society.

We are looking for people to share their stories about food. PFM’s blog features posts about food in the Pacific NW from award winning local authors, to first time contributors to the

One of My Muses

farmers, ranchers and growers who feed us. Along with stories about Oregonians who grow our food, our blog has recipes, information on what is in season and my favorite genre of post, the Esscipe – part cooking instruction, part essay, writing aimed at delving into the heart of how food makes us feel and think.

You think you’d like to give food writing a try but aren’t ready to email off a submission? Next week, our friends at Write Around Portland are having a food writing workshop with Portland Author and Mix founding editor, Martha Holmberg. If you don’t know about Write Around Portland, you can learn more about them at their website or Facebook page, where you can like them and it’s easy to for they are dedicated individuals who believe in “Transforming lives and our communities through the power of writing”. They lead creative writing workshops for 500 people each year, in hospitals, schools, homeless youth shelters, senior centers, low income housing buildings, prisons, social service agencies and treatment facilities. They’re able to run these workshops thanks in part toPrompt at Powell’s City of Books and twice monthly workshops at HOTLIPS Pizza, both are for new and experienced writers who, “want to participate in a Write Around Portland workshop and support the communities [Write Around Portland] traditionally serve.”

On Thursday, June, 28th at 6:30 Write Around Portland is hosting a foodcentric event with Martha Holmberg. The $50 fee includes a light meal of crepes, a conversation about food writing with Martha Holmberg and Kim Carlson, the Editorial Director of Culinate and a copy of Martha’s newest cookbook Crepes: 50 Savory and Sweet Recipes. Tickets available by calling Beth White of Write Around Portland at 503-796-9224.

Over the next month or so PFM will be adding new contributors to our stable of writers and we’d like to invite you to submit your ideas about food, both local and personal. While any online or print publication can use professional writers, we want to share our platform with people who have a story to tell about food in Oregon, but aren’t necessarily WRITERS! Stories should be cogent, readable, but contributors don’t need a MFA in food writing to post on our blog.

Please email your ideas, pitches and articles to me, dave@portlandfarmersmarket.org. We have the capacity to walk rookie writers and first time contributors through an editing process to get ready for submission, plus this is a great way to get clips together, advertise your own blog to all the PFM readers or give yourself a chance periodically write about food for than no other reason than you have a story to tell. We look forward to your stories.

 

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Pioneering Spirit

Thanks to Weinstein PR

Monday, June 18 marks the return of KINK.fm presents Portland Farmers Market at the Square. In its third year, the downtown market features 35 vendors selling local farm-fresh produce, meats, cheeses, baked goods and other specialty foods, as well as four prepared food vendors for those looking to grab lunch. Opening day will feature musical entertainment by James Clem.

Pioneer Courthouse Square Market will be held every Monday from June 18 to September 24 (excluding Labor Day, September 3), from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Square is the city’s beloved outdoor “living room,” located between SW Broadway and SW Sixth, and SW Morrison and SW Yamhill.

Portland Farmers Market and Pioneer Courthouse Square are also partnering for the second year to bring A Taste of Portland Farmers Market at the Square from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons during the Noon Tunes Summer Concert Series which is free to the public. Running Tuesday, July 10 to August 16, the ever-popular Noon Tunes will showcase some of the best in regional and local musical talent. Concert-goers can enjoy dishes made primarily with ingredients sourced through farmers market vendors.

“Summer is truly here with the opening of these vibrant farmers markets on the Square,” said Trudy Toliver executive director of Portland Farmers Market. “We love partnering with KINK and Pioneer Courthouse Square to bring local farmers into the heart of the city to sell our region’s bounty to downtown shoppers, tourists, residents and workers.”

Additionally, the Square will serve as the backdrop of the Portland Farmers Market’s second annual COUNTRY Chef Challenge on Monday, July 16, 2012. The Challenge hosted by KGW-TV’s Drew Carney will pit three local chefs against each other in a live cooking competition at the Square.

Pioneer Courthouse Square Market Vendors

About 35 vendor stalls will crop up on the famous red bricks every Monday. Three vendors new to the Portland Farmers Market family – Fungi Farm Shiitake, Marshall’s Haute Sauce and Split River Growers – will join the market lineup.

Overview of New Vendors

  • Split River Growers – Nestled on the southern tip of Sauvie Island where the Willamette River splits into the Columbia, Split River Growers sustainably plants, fertilizes and harvests by hand greens, table vegetables, herbs and flowers, using no chemicals or pesticides. Their produce never travels further than 20 miles, often much less. Their goal is to use as few resources as possible to offer the freshest of what the earth has to offer.
  • Fungi Farm Shiitake – Started in 2005 by Tony Synarski and Bobbie Mohler, Fungi Farm allows people to grow their own shiitake mushrooms on logs. Their shiitake mushroom logs are produced from hand selected oak and alder trees and are cut, cleaned and inoculated at the perfect time of year to promote high nutrient levels in the wood, ensuring a long life and prolific mushroom production for years to come.
  • Marshall’s Haute Sauce – Marshall’s Haute Sauce creates delicious fresh and local small-batch hot sauce to those craving heat and spice. Their sauces have unique spice blends and flavor combinations. All sauces are gluten free, vegetarian, and vegan. They believe in small business owners, farmers and producers, and work with as many as possible.

Farmers and Ranchers

Bakeries and Food Artisans

Prepared Food Vendors

* New vendor for the 2012 season

For up-to-date information on vendor maps and other events at the market, shoppers can visit the Pioneer Courthouse Square Market page.

In addition to the Portland Farmers Market at the Square, Portland Farmers Market operates seven other weekly markets – four neighborhood markets: Kenton in North Portland, Buckman in Southeast Portland, Northwest in Northwest Portland, and King in Northeast Portland; and three other downtown markets: PSU, Shemanski Park, and the Winter Market.

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Pioneer Courthouse Square starts its season on Monday. Every Monday between 10 am and 2pm until the end of September, anyone who finds themselves downtown can pick up produce, have lunch and enjoy a little piece of agricultural Oregon in the center of Portland. Our friends at Weinstein PR put together a complete list of vendors, products and lunch options, check it out below.

Our Newest Market, the Kenton, runs this evening between 3 & 7 at Denver and McClellan. If you’re taking the Max, detrain at the Kenton stop, take a left at Paul Bunyan and you can’t miss us. Make a whole evening of it, grab a beer at the Kenton Station, go the library, get your haircut at $7 bucks a whack and if somehow you don’t want tacos from the Taco Pedaler, pick up some Thai food from E-San.

On Saturday, the weather (mid 80s; On a weekend! How awesome is that? I know it’s a leading question), will be the star of the show. Next billing, Chef Cory Schreiber is leading young cooks through a recipe of Summer Berry Fool with Cookie Crumb toppings. This weekend’s class is booked up, but check out our website for more class dates. The classes run from 8:30 – 10:00am and cost $5 per child per class. Cory, the weather plus berries and  some cherries, possibly some late season asparagus, you’ll definitely find artichokes…sorry to interject some math here, especially a pernicious word problem but fresh eggs + spring garlic = killer aioli.

Grown ups can get a cooking lesson too, and from one of Portland’s best.  Hosted by Allison Jones of Portland Monthly, Saturday’s Chef in the Market will feature Cathy Whims of Nostrana and Oven & Shaker.  Portland Monthly will also be on hand passing out free magazines near the chef’s stage.

Pour Some Aioli On Me!

Sunday for King Market, not quite as nice of weather, but still pretty nice, in addition to all the items listed above you can start your day with Night Owl Coffee and finish it by grilling something from the Deck Family or Columbia River Salmon.10-2, NE 7th & Wygant.

As of Monday, PFM has 7 of its 8 markets operating and as much as we loved our Winter Market, there is just no way its schedule will work in June. There are about 40 Farmers Markets in the Portland Metro area (you can visit other markets’ websites on the blogroll to the right). There are lots of people who work hard to make sure agriculture is a viable career and local foods a realistic consumer option in Oregon, but special shout out to the folks who put together the Lents International Market,  opening for the season this weekend, good luck with your season.

Overview of PCS Vendors

NEW!

Split River Growers – Nestled on the southern tip of Sauvie Island where the Willamette River splits into the Columbia, Split River Growers sustainably plants, fertilizes and harvests by hand greens, table vegetables, herbs and flowers, using no chemicals or pesticides. Their produce never travels further than 20 miles, often much less. Their goal is to use as few resources as possible to offer the freshest of what the earth has to offer.

Fungi Farm Shiitake – Started in 2005 by Tony Synarski and Bobbie Mohler, Fungi Farm allows people to grow their own shiitake mushrooms on logs. Their shiitake mushroom logs are produced from hand selected oak and alder trees and are cut, cleaned and inoculated at the perfect time of year to promote high nutrient levels in the wood, ensuring a long life and prolific mushroom production for years to come.

Marshall’s Haute Sauce – Marshall’s Haute Sauce creates delicious fresh and local small-batch hot sauce to those craving heat and spice. Their sauces have unique spice blends and flavor combinations. All sauces are gluten free, vegetarian, and vegan. They believe in small business owners, farmers and producers, and work with as many as possible.

Portland Creamery – This Portland-based artisan goat cheese producer is focused on providing high quality traditional as well as unique goat cheeses. Their award-winning cheese is made using family recipes with the finest ingredients. Their vision is to promote the awareness of the benefits of goat cheese as a natural and healthy food source. Locally produced and handcrafted, their cheeses are 100% hormone free.

Returning Farmers and Ranchers

Baird Family Orchards – Dayton, OR C & K’s Flower Garden – Molalla, OR – Cherry Country – Rickreall, OR dancing light ranch – Portland, OR   Lucky Farms – Gresham, OR Market Fruit/Packer Orchards – Hood River, OR Rick Steffen Farm – Salem, OR Salmon Creek Farm – Battle Ground, WA South Barlow Berries – Canby, OR   Tamiyasu Orchards Inc – Hood River, OR  The Berry Patch – Woodburn, OR  Unger Farms – Cornelius, OR Valley Berry Farm – Scotts Mills, OR  Bakeries and Food Artisans Black Sheep Bakery – Portland, OR Blossom Vinegars – Portland, OR Columbia River Smoked Salmon – Portland, OR Gabriel’s Bakery – Portland, OR  Grand Central Bakery – Portland, OR HOTLIPS Soda – Portland, OR  Missionary Chocolates – Portland, OR Nehalem Bay Winery – Nehalem, OR Nut-Tritious Foods – Vancouver, WA Olympic Provisions – Portland, OR, Rogue Creamery – Central Point, OR Two Tarts Bakery – Portland, OR Willamette Valley Cheese – Salem, OR

Prepared Food Vendors C’est Si Bon! – Portland, OR LoveJoy Food – Portland, OR Tastebud – Portland, OR Verde Cocina – Portland, OR

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Seriously

By Lindsay Yousey, Owner Serious Business Pastries

Here at Serious Business Pastries, our Peanut Butter-n-Jelly Sandwich Cookie is developing a bit of a cult following. Customers  constantly ask me how I came up with the idea, in the “but of course!” sort of way that suggests to me that I may just have stumbled upon the one logical endpoint for the peanut butter cookie. This is the story of how I got there.

The simple peanut butter cookie is a humble creation, one that’s very often done wrong. It can either be too sweet, too floury, too dry, not fudgy enough — the list goes on. Over the years I’ve had my fair share of subpar peanut butter cookie experiences, and that’s a shame because I have such a penchant for all-things peanut butter. In talking with people around Portland, I noticed that we shared a common experience: We could name where a person could obtain the best French baguette, the best sausages, the best seasonal produce, the best cupcakes. But no one could say for certain who had the best peanut butter cookies.

When I started developing the bakery’s menu, I made it my goal to create a standout peanut butter cookie that would cause people to fall in love with it all over again. I wanted the cookie itself to harken back to its origins, prior to Pillsbury’s popularizing of the criss-cross marks; a baked treat that contained simple ingredients, but had a quirky, almost endearing, component to it that would set it apart from the competition. I wanted to create a cookie that would excite people, because dessert should excite people. If it doesn’t, then it’s just wasted calories. Food is necessary to sustain life, but dessert isn’t. Since dessert is not a requirement for everyday living, it ought to be worth every penny and every calorie.

And so, after careful thought, and a lot of daydreaming, the Peanut Butter-n-Jelly Sandwich Cookie came into existence. The idea made perfect sense. Two delicious, soft, tender, peanut butter cookies, sandwiched and held together in absolute harmony by Oregonian jam and a housemade peanut butter filling.

I made certain to include some of the best ingredients available — those found in Oregon, of course! All of Serious Business Pastries’s wheat-based products have either Bob’s Red Mill, or Shepherd’s Grain Flour; the PB&J Sandwich Cookie is no exception. The cookies also contain locally produced butter, as well as eggs from either cage-free or pasture raised chickens at either Stiebrs Farms, or Champoeg Farms. The cookie’s filling contains rich European-style butter from Larsen Creamery in Clackamas, as well as Oregonian honey from either Oregon Growers and Shippers, Wessel’s Family Honey, or from one of the many farmers who sell at the weekly Portland Farmers’ Market. I make certain that I source all the jam from one or more farms in Oregon as well. For much of the year you’ll find raspberry jam in the middle of the cookies, because they’re my favorite berry, and Oregon grows the best raspberries I have ever had the privilege of trying. But when marionberries come into season I like to honor this very Oregon fruit by using marionberry jam.

You can find this delicious creation, and more scrumptious treats, at the Serious Business Pastries booth at the Northwest Thursday Farmers Market (June 7-September 27). I hope to see you there!

Lindsay Yousey, Owner

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